Injury prevention and death review:
Keeping Kids Alive in Wisconsin

The Alliance leads the Keeping Kids Alive in Wisconsin program in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Maternal and Child Health, Title V Program. Keeping Kids Alive is comprised of child death review (CDR) and fetal infant mortality review (FIMR) teams in each county or region. The teams are multidisciplinary and prevention focused. Both types of teams share information learned from their review processes to improve the health and safety of communities. Learn more about both teams. Learn more about the history of CDR and FIMR.

Wisconsin has 48 CDR teams, covering 51 counties and 90 percent of the population. Additionally there are 7 counties with active FIMR teams. View map.

Child Death Review (CDR)

CDR teams are a community response to a child’s death. CDR teams are critical in gaining a better understanding of how and why a child died. We have statistics on how many children die and from what causes, but often know little about the circumstances leading up to the child’s death. CDR teams increase agency collaboration to improve health and safety, and demonstrate a commitment to keeping kids alive. Local child death review teams are created at the discretion of local leaders, operating voluntarily with limited resources. These multidisciplinary teams review and acknowledge all intentional and unintentional child deaths utilizing a prevention framework. The Alliance and partners provide technical assistance, training and resources for prevention efforts to all local teams.

Fetal Infant Mortality Review (FIMR)

Local FIMR teams are a mechanism for improving community outcomes, and maternal and infant health. FIMR teams seek to improve birth outcomes and reduce disparities. Stillbirths and infant deaths are reviewed by a FIMR team to gain a greater understanding of the risk factors and circumstances surrounding each death. Teams make recommendations for improving birth outcomes, access to care, system collaboration and gaps in services. FIMR teams are multidisciplinary groups of professionals and agency members who represent the community. The Alliance and partners provide technical assistance, training and resources for prevention efforts to all local teams.

Partners

The Alliance is working in collaboration with the following agencies:
City of Milwaukee Health Department
Injury Research Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin
Public Health Madison and Dane County
Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Maternal and Child Health, Title V
Zilber School of Public Health at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Child Death Review Council (CDRC)

The statewide CDRC provides policy guidance, reviews statewide data to identify trends and supports local death review teams. Membership to the CDRC is appointed by the Secretary of DHS. In 2012, the CDRC membership was expanded to include members who represent FIMR. The goal of the state CDRC is to reduce preventable childhood deaths. Aggregate, de-identified information gathered by local death review teams is shared with the state CDRC in order to address issues plaguing multiple counties or regions. The CDRC makes recommendations to DHS and the Wisconsin state legislature. View members.

Partnerships: The Building Blocks of Transformation

Nov. 9-10, 2016

Keynote: The Power of Possibility, Sylvia Cheuy, M-SI, Tamarack Institute

Keynote: Making Change Happen Through a Systems-Based Approach, Erin Reiney, MPH, health Resources and Services Administration

Keynote: Advocacy is a Team Sport, Mark Del Monte, JD, American Academy of Pediatrics

Keynote: Books Build Better Brains: How Promoting Literacy is the Key to Early Brain and Childhood Development, Dipesh Navsaria, MPH, MSLIS, MD, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

1.1 and 3.2 Using Data to Build Partnerships and Drive Action to Address the Opioid Epidemic, Lisa Bullard Cawthorne, MS, MPH, and Kerry Zaleski, MPH, Bureau of Community Health Promotion, Division of Public Health, Department of Health Services and Population Services, University of Wisconsin School of Public Health and Medicine; Kerry Zaleski, MPH, Bureau of Community Health Promotion, Division of Public Health, Department of Health Services and Population Health Services, University of Wisconsin School and Medicine and Public Health

1.2 Do We Really Know Why? Improving Stillbirth and Infant Reviews to Enhance Prevention , Jason Jarzembowski, MD, PhD, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin and Medical College of Wisconsin

1.3 Bearing Witness to Pain: Coping with Secondary Trauma, Ann Rolling, PhD, LPC, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin- Community Services

2.1 Deepening Fatality Reviews by Incorporating the Family Perspective, Patt Young, Contra Costa Health Department

2.2 Deaths and Near Deaths of Infants and Toddlers: Screening for Child Abuse, Lynn Sheets, MD, FAAP, Children's Hospital of Wisconsin and Medical College of Wisconsin

2.3 Cultivating Citizen Leadership for Collective Impact, Sylvia Cheuy, M-SI, Tamarack Institute

2.4 and 3.3 What Do We Mean By Health Equity Anyway? , Geoffrey R. Swain, MD, MPH, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

3.1 Wisconsin First Step and the MCH Hotline: Connecting People to the Resources They Need, Mary Mundt Reckase, Wisconsin First Step, Teresa Halverson, CRS, Wisconsin Public Health Information and Referral Services

4.2 What Are The Laws Anyway? Understanding ATV and UTV Laws and Prevention, Todd Schaller, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

 

For more information, please contact Karen Nash at (414) 337-4567.

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Did you know...

Kids should wear a helmet and other safety gear to prevent injuries while inline skating. Learn more.